Projects

EXPRESS main study

Most children who are born 12–17 weeks too early survive. This is good news, but we don’t know what happens to the children during their childhood. How do they grow? Do their sight and hearing function properly? Are they as intelligent as other children? There are many questions to which both parents and those working with these children want answers.

In the EXPRESS study, all children born before the 27th week of pregnancy were examined at the age of two and a half. The children underwent a comprehensive examination including:

Psychological testing

Medical examination

Eye examination

Height and weight measurement

The parents were asked to answer questions on their perceptions of their child.

Since it was important to find out whether the premature babies had developed properly and how they compared to healthy children born at full term, the results from each premature baby were compared with those of a child born at full term.

Index child = Born before the 27th week of pregnancy

Control child = Born at full term

A research group is now in the process of compiling the results of all the examinations and we will shortly publish the results on the EXPRESS website.

Follow-up at six and a half

Most children who are born 12–17 weeks too early survive. This is good news, but we don’t know what happens to the children during their childhood. How do they grow? Do their sight and hearing function properly? Are they as intelligent as other children? There are many questions to which both parents and those working with these children want answers. In the EXPRESS study, all children born before the 27th week of pregnancy were examined at the age of two and a half. The children underwent a comprehensive examination and the results of the follow-up will be published shortly.

It is important that we continue to investigate how extremely premature babies do in life. We don’t know whether problems that were present at the age of two and a half will improve or worsen as the child gets older. Do new difficulties arise? Have the children who had poor growth at two and half caught up by the age of six and a half? Is ADHD common among those who were extremely premature babies?

The follow-up at six and half is currently underway. The children are requested to attend a hospital appointment, usually at the university hospital where the child has been cared for.

The child undergoes a comprehensive examination with a:

Psychologist

Physiotherapist

Ophthalmologist

Height and weight measurement

The parents are asked to answer questions on their perceptions of their child.

If you have any questions about the follow-up at six and a half, you are welcome to contact those in charge of the study in the region where you live.